starbucks

how old do you have to be to work at starbucks

I’m often amazed that there is a minimum workforce age at Starbucks.

Why do they not require a customer to have a license to be served a coffee? It’s not as if the training process for a Starbucks employee is so elaborate or demanding that one can’t do it before the age of 18

. I already had a driver’s license and a passport when I started working there. This shows the extent to which government intervention is involved in child labor laws.

If you’re old enough to drive, go on date, spend money that your parents earn, then why aren’t you old enough to productively work at Starbucks?

how old do you have to be work at starbucks

For 40 years, Starbucks has been saying that it is looking for people who share its values:

“We create opportunities for everyone.” And nowhere does the company say that it wants to hire “experienced people.”
This can seem odd, because the company does not ask for experience when hiring.

If people apply, they fill out an application and answer some standard questions.

One asks, “What’s your favorite movie?” Another asks, “What’s something you like to do in your spare time?” A third asks, “What is your dream job?” Not one of them asks, “Tell us about your work experience.”
Most applicants don’t get hired. But the ones who do get hired all have one thing in common:

they are young. The youngest person the company hired in 2015 was 22. The minimum age to work at Starbucks is 16. In 2006, the company hired a 16-year-old to work its store at Seattle’s Space Needle.

The next year it hired a 17-year-old to work its store in Fremont, California.
The company’s age requirements aren’t just unusual:

they’re unusual in an industry whose average employee age is 42. Starbucks hopes that its age requirements will encourage people who wouldn’t otherwise want to work in the fast food industry to apply.

“If someone is 16, 17, or 18 and they want a job,” the company says, “we’re going to give them a job.”
But are they?
It turns out that most employers pay little attention to whether an applicant is 16, 17, or 18. They tend to hire people

 

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